250th Anniversary Innovation Fund Awardees

In December 2017, Princeton faculty submitted nineteen proposals to the 250th Anniversary Fund for Innovation in Undergraduate Education. Twelve proposals were awarded funding by the selection committee, which included the dean and deputy dean of the college, the dean and senior associate dean of the faculty, the director of the McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning, and the director of the Princeton Writing Program.

A. James Link

A. James Link

Foundations of Chemical and Biological Engineering

Our goal is to develop a new course within the chemical and biological engineering (CBE) department for spring semester first-year undergraduates that answers the question 'what is CBE?'. This course will provide students exposure to the concepts they will explore in more depth later in the curriculum while also introducing them to exciting developments in modern chemical and biological engineering. The societal impact of the discipline of chemical and biological engineering will be emphasized.

Joao Biehl

Joao Biehl

Bridging Theory and Practice in Undergraduate Community Engaged Scholarship

The Global Health Program (GHP) proposes to develop a suite of courses and workshops to help Princeton students better integrate their academic coursework with their service aspirations and experiences. These courses will serve as a much-needed expansion to the curricular offerings for our large cadre of GHP certificate students, but will also be open to non-GHP students participating in the university's anticipated expansion in service learning opportunities.

Sarah A. Chihaya

Sarah A. Chihaya

Historical Fiction/Fictional History

We are applying for course development for an innovative new "gateway" course in English. Our goal is to build a permanent course to introduce potential Majors to the discipline. As its starting point, the course takes up a pressing question generated by our contemporary moment, in which allegations of 'fake news' proliferate: looking at the categories of "historical fiction" and "history," how can we read and think critically about how both facts and fictions structure the public imagination?

Alexander K. Davis

Alexander K. Davis

Quantitative Materials, Methods, and Models for the Writing Seminars

I propose the development of pedagogic resources for teaching quantitative reasoning in the Writing Seminars. Such resources would enable transfer at two levels: for students, who need the opportunity to practice using quantitative evidence in a written argument early and often in their Princeton careers, and for our faculty, who need a range of resources at their disposal for enabling that practice in their Writing Seminars—regardless of their home discipline.

Maia Ginsburg

Maia Ginsburg

New Assignments for COS126 and COS226

Computer Science: An Interdisciplinary Approach (COS126) and Data Structures and Algorithms (COS 226) are offered every semester. COS126 is the largest enrolled course on campus, with COS226 tagging not far behind. It is imperative that the course remain up to date providing cutting edge applications and an introduction to the ever expanding course offerings of the Computer Science department. This proposal is an attempt to update the course assignments.

Jeffrey D. Himpele

Jeffrey D. Himpele

Flipping Forensics: Increasing Proficiency in Evaluating Human Skeletal Maturity with Online Learning and Enhanced Labs

A new online course environment for lectures and activities to increase student proficiency in determining human skeletal age. Measuring hand x-rays and gauging the sometimes ambiguous stages of bone development with accuracy and consistency is demanding for novices. We will increase students' competence by flipping the related lectures and increasing the time in class when instructors closely interact with students as they develop their conclusions. The online course would be offered as a MOOC.

N. Jeremy Kasdin

N. Jeremy Kasdin

Multivariable Calculus: An Engineering Perspective

This course on multivariable calculus is part of the new introductory freshman sequence for entering engineers. While it is a sophomore course it follows from the new math sequence started in freshman year. This is part of the pilot program for freshman initiated as a result of the SEAS strategic plan that teaches the core courses from an applied and design perspective. We hope this will increase retention and interest in engineering and better prepare students.

Joshua I. Kotin

Joshua I. Kotin

American Literary History

A complete redesign of American Literary History (ENG 201) to appeal to a wider range of students, and directly engage University priorities concerning inclusivity and diversity, memory and memorialization, and local and global history.

Hisae Matsui

Hisae Matsui

Personalized Flipped Curriculum for Elementary Japanese Courses

This project aims to transform current JPN101/102 Elementary Japanese I/II courses to a more SLA (Second Language Acquisition) theory-based and more personalized courses by introducing flipped learning.

Adam Oberlin

Adam Oberlin

Restructuring the Second-Year German Curriculum

Given the success of the previously funded DER DIE DAS textbook project and a desire for continuity in the language sequence, I propose a thorough revision of the GER 105-107 curriculum. This would include the following elements: restructuring the curriculum and materials in intermediate courses for improved vocabulary and grammar integration; developing of a new approach to analytical and idiomatic vocabulary acquisition; and creating a website platform for extending frequency vocabulary to 2,0

Jason L. Puchalla

Jason L. Puchalla

Development of an integrated video library for PHY108

This is a new online pathway to integrate the class experience in PHY108. Working with undergraduates, I will develop an edX accessible library of video examples of exam-level questions that demonstrate learning expectations. Importantly, these examples will illustrate creative problem solving expected when mastering the course. Videos will be created in conjunction with the McGraw Center production staff during this 2-year effort and be refined based on course assessments and student feedback.

Daniel I. Rubenstein

Daniel I. Rubenstein

Comparing Framing Practices: A Powerful Learning Tool for Assessing Agriculture's Environmental Footprint

Interactions among what individuals eat, what agricultural systems produce and how both impact the environment is the course’s focus. Lectures present first principles; readings present examples; precepts provide opportunities to discuss both; culinary labs present food choice experiments and independent projects using biological, ecological, social and economic data from local farms using different techniques will enable students to assess tradeoffs that farming for the future will face.

Daniel L. Trueman

Daniel L. Trueman

Musical Instruments, Sound, Perception, and Creativity

Musical instruments reside at the intersection of a range of subjects: sound and acoustics, perception, embodiment, creativity, musicology and music theory, social values, and more. In this course, we will look at how the designs of musical instruments, the piano, in particular, touch on various topics, through repertoire assignments, projects, and labs.

Ali A. Valenzuela

Ali A. Valenzuela

"Learning by Doing": POL 341 Experimental Methods in Politics Annual Survey, Resource Repository and Capstone Event

This proposal is to enhance POL 341 with a learning-by-doing pedagogical approach to experimental methods in which students conceive, design and analyze their own original survey experiments addressing timely and important questions about politics. Through surveys conducted on the Princeton student body and broader U.S. public, an end-of-year capstone event, and an online repository of data and research results, proposed activities will have a wide reach and positive impact on future students.

Tamsen O. Wolff

Tamsen O. Wolff

Public Speaking

The re-imagined ENG 230 will be part of a new menu of "gateway" courses the English Department is developing, a set of permanent courses that introduce potential Majors to the discipline by emphasizing the diversity of materials and methodologies they will encounter. In particular, ENG 230 will introduce first year and sophomore students to the critical central skill we teach: how to make an articulate, powerful, and persuasive argument, but with the focus on speech.